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jewelry glossary

Antique jewelry glossary

Welcome to our extensive antique jewelry glossary with around 1,500 jewelry related entries.If you feel you are missing an explanation, feel free to let us know and we will add it.

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Horse shoe

horse shoe

See our: horse jewelry.

There is no consensus among historians as to when and by who horseshoes were first invented. What seems most plausible is that shoeing was invented by numerous armorers in different places at about the same time, and then kept as a military secret for a very short time - until the practice was apparently widespread. Fact is that to date they are considered to bring good-luck.

Horseshoes are considered as a good luck charm in many cultures. The shape, fabrication, placement, and manner are all important. A common tradition is that if a horseshoe is hung on a door with the two ends pointing up then good luck will occur. However, if the two ends point downwards then bad luck will occur. Traditions do differ on this point, though.

In some cultures, the horseshoe is hung points down (so the luck pours onto you). In others, it is hung points up (so the luck doesn't fall out); still in others it doesn't matter so long as the horseshoe has been used (not new), was found (not purchased), and can be touched. In all traditions, luck is contained in the shoe and can pour out through the ends.

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