basket Your basket >
>
Your wishlist >
reset search

XMAS SALE, 25% OFF!!!* !
*Use code: "BRRR2017" at checkout. Not cumulative with this or other promotions, Only 5% discount on already discounted items. Valid until Dec. 31th 2017
We offer layaway, spread payments on the piece of your dreams. Ask us for details. Free insured shipping on all orders !!!

jewelry glossary

Antique jewelry glossary

Welcome to our extensive antique jewelry glossary with around 1,500 jewelry related entries.If you feel you are missing an explanation, feel free to let us know and we will add it.

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z     all

Marcasite

marcasite

See our: marcasite jewelry.

Originally and strictly, common crystallized iron pyrites, an iron sulphide mineral; later the word became a misnomer for iron disulphide (pyrite or white iron pyrites) that is of the same chemical composition and resembles it but is of different structure and lower specific gravity.

True marcasite (which is almost white, resembling pale bronze) was used in jewelry by the Greek and the Incas, but the substitute pyrite was used extensively in Europe from the 18th century onwards, especially in France. Marcasite and pyrite have been imitated with glass, cut steel, and plastic, but are readily distinguishable from these, although not from each other. Having been sometimes set in a marquise ring, it has occasionally been erroneously spelled 'marquisite'. Marcasite is usually set in silver (sometimes pewter), and is generally rose cut or mounted in pavé setting to enhance it sparkle, due to surface reflection rather than internal light. Some cheap examples are set in rhodium-plated mounts mad eof a base metal, sometimes set with paste and enamelled. It has been sometimes referred to incorrectly as fool's gold, which is a term for pyrite. The term 'marcasite' is today often loosely applied in the trade to cut steel or even any white metal cut with facets.

From: An Illustrated Dictionary of Jewelry, autor: Harold Newman, publishers: Thames and Hudson

Jewelry Glossary

Missing an explanation?
click here to request one

Jewelry Theme Search
Antique Jewelry Lecture
Adin Wallpapers    Help    Shipping Policy    Dealer Terms    Special Requests    Follow us on :   Twitter   Facebook   Google+   Instagram   Links
Home  |   Site Security  |   Track your Order   |   Return Policy   |   Contact Us  |   Antwerp  |   Terms And Conditions   |   Site Map  |   Blog  |   Testimonials  |   In Memoriam